OAK STORIES

AMAZON TEARS

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the extraction of rubber latex and its commercialization to produce bicycle and automobile tires led to a widespread expansion of European colonization in the Amazon rainforest. These caused cultural and social transformations, which were especially dramatic for the indigenous populations. According to anthropologist Wade Davis, it is estimated that for every ton of rubber produced, ten natives were killed and hundreds were scarred for life by whips, wounds and amputations.

One of the countries most affected by the effects of the massive extraction of latex is Bolivia, the most indigenous country on the Latin American continent. Nowadays, we can witness how indigenous groups and languages such as the Pacahuara and others like the Chácobos, Esse Ejja and Takana are on the verge of extinction and must fight every day to defend their rights. Although these rights are recognized in the Bolivian constitution, they are continually violated. The death of these cultures signifies the disappearance of a particular, unique and different vision of the world. Perhaps it is not a coincidence that the natives baptized the latex tree with the name of Cauchu, which literally means "the tree that cries".

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BOLIVIA TEAM

This documentary project will be developed with the efforts of a multidisciplinary team composed by

mingo_venero

Mingo Venero

Photographer

wayra_ficapal

Wayra Ficapal

Journalist